Hayley Craig – personal profile

I am a NERC funded PhD student looking at how agricultural runoff affects mangrove plant and soil communities and the implications for nutrient cycling. I have previously worked in Australia as a contaminated land consultant and more recently as a research technician in the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology looking at evolutionary barley genetic adaptations linked to the spread of agriculture across Europe.

Twitter: @hayzleypop

Hayley Craig
Hayley Craig – personal profile

Dave Johnson – personal profile

I am a terrestrial ecologist with a particular interest in understanding how plants interact with the myriad organisms that live in soil, especially symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi, and the consequences of these interactions for biogeochemical cycles. My research falls under three main areas: i) how components of biodiversity (functional groups, species and genotype) regulate ecosystem functions such as greenhouse gas production and nutrient cycling, ii) the ecological and evolutionary implications of multi-trophic interactions, including those mediated below ground by mycorrhizal fungal networks, and above ground via vertebrate and invertebrate herbivores and seabirds, and iii) impacts of land-use, climate and environmental change on ecosystem processes. My work cuts across several scales, from genotypes to communities, and involves working in a diversity of environments to answer particular questions. For example, current research is concerned with tropical forests, boreal forest, extensive and intensive grassland, and cropping systems. To address many of my research questions, I use radio and stable isotope tracers both in the laboratory and the field, and take a reductionist approach to manipulate critical components of biodiversity. Much of my research is supported by grants from NERC and BBSRC.

Biography
Feb 2017-present. N8 Chair in Microbial Ecology, The University of Manchester
Oct 2014-Feb 2017. Director of Research, School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen
2008-Feb 2017. Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, Reader, Professor, School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen
2003-2008. NERC Advanced Fellow, based at the University of Aberdeen
1998-2003. Research Associate at University of Sheffield. I focused on understanding how arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi regulate carbon and nutrient cycling in grasslands, including the discovery that springtails disrupt the functioning of hyphal networks.
1997-1998. Research Assistant at University of Sheffield demonstrating how UV-B radiation impacts nutrient cycling in Arctic heathlands
1998. PhD University of Sheffield. I investigated how atmospheric deposition of nitrogen impacts on above and below ground components of grasslands and heathlands. A key discovery was the demonstration that even modest inputs of nitrogen substantially change the demand and use of phosphorus. Supervised by Profs Jonathan Leake and John Lee.

 DJ and pony Foula
Dave Johnson – personal profile

Franciska De Vries – personal profile

My research focusses on how plant communities and soil organisms interact to influence ecosystem functioning, with a focus on carbon and nitrogen cycling, and I am particularly interested in how these interactions change under global change. Currently, my main interest is what determines ecosystem stability under climate change. I have just started a 5 year BBSRC funded David Phillips Fellowship, with the aim of mechanistically elucidating the role of plant roots, via their root exudates, in ecosystem response to climate change.

I am also the founder and secretary of the British Ecological Society’s special interest group Plants, Soils, Ecosystem.

Franciska De Vries
Franciska De Vries – personal profile

Ellen Fry – personal profile

I work for the NERC funded Wessex BESS project heading up the grasslands and carbon sequestration work package. I am primarily interested in how plant functional effects traits interact with global change drivers to impact ecosystem function in grasslands. I use a mixture of field, lab and statistical methods to determine the effects of community manipulation and drought upon carbon stocks and fluxes, water use efficiency and soil fertility.
Ellen Fry
Ellen Fry – personal profile

Jennifer Rhymes – personal profile

My role here at Manchester is to provide technical support for a NERC funded consortium project, part of NERC’s Soil Security Programme. Our project aims to explore what controls the ability of soils and their functions (related to biogeochemical cycling and greenhouse gas production) to withstand, recover and potentially adapt to disturbance events in rapidly changing environments.

Twitter: @EcoRhymes

Jennifer Rhymes
Jennifer Rhymes – personal profile

Maarten Schrama – personal profile

My research has a strong focus on ecosystem processes and the factor that cause stability or instability in ecosystem functioning. The first part of my project is about invasive species. It has been shown that some ecosystems are more vulnerable to invasion than others but this phenomenon is currently not well understood. This project aims to understand the key driving principles behind successful settlement of invasive exotic plant species and focuses on the role of the microbial community and its reaction to disturbances. The second part of this project is about effects of large herbivores on long-term stability of soil carbon, nutrients and soil food webs. Large herbivores dominate ecological processes in upland grasslands, but little is known about the effect they have on the medium to very long term. This is particularly relevant as almost 1/3 of all soil carbon is stored in grasslands. In this study, I use a range of long-term (25-85-year old) grazing experiments, spread out across the latitudinal gradient of the UK. Besides field measurements at all the different sites, we carried out climate chamber experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of realistic climate scenarios on ecosystem stability.
Maarten Schraama
Maarten Schrama – personal profile

Jocelyn M. Lavallee – personal profile

I am a Postdoctoral Research Associate investigating the stability of the soil system in the face of land use and climate change, as part of the NERC Soil Security Programme. I’m broadly interested in soil biogeochemistry, especially the controls on carbon cycling, ecosystem functioning, and soil fertility. My other passions include climbing rocks, drinking good beer, and riding my bike.

Twitter: @JM_Lavallee

Jocelyn Lavallee
Jocelyn M. Lavallee – personal profile