Facilities – right hand column

Surface-water-gley developed in glacial till, Northern Ireland. Reproduced with kind permission of HolgerK, Wikipedia.

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Cristina Heredia Acuña – personal profile

I get my Bachelor Degree in Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico on Biology (2004-2008) and my Master Degree in Colegio de Postgraduados in Edaphology (2009-2011)

My PhD research at the UoM will try to elucidate the mechanisms through which roots affect soil C cycling, in monocultures and in species mixtures. I will focus on root turnover and decomposition. Additionally, I will be testing how these processes could be affected by events like drought and warming. Using field and glasshouse experiments, and a combination of non-destructive methodologies, joint with litter bags and chemical analysis to determine changes on carbon dynamics.

Cristina Heredia Acuña – personal profile

Melanie Jane Edgar – personal profile

My interest is in utilising research techniques to develop applicable land management strategies for farmers at the individual farm-scale to improve animal welfare and offset environmental impacts whilst maintaining economic viability within the agricultural industry. I am currently reading for a PhD Environmental Biology at the University of Manchester, funded as a BBSRC CASE student working with Natural England and the National Trust. My project aims to explore how grazing influences soil carbon and nitrogen storage, and greenhouse gas emissions in upland grasslands. The ultimate goal is to provide a mechanistic understanding of the effects of grazing that can be used to formulate land management strategies for climate mitigation in the uplands.
MelanieEdgar
Melanie Jane Edgar – personal profile

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New book

Cover of Earth Matters

Earth Matters: How soil underlies civilisation

By Richard D Bardgett, January 28th 2016 by Oxford University Press, 224 pages, ISBN: 9780199668564.

Richard Bardgett’s new book, Earth Matters, discusses the many, and sometimes surprising, ways that humanity has depended on soil throughout history, and still does today. Analysing the role soil plays in our own lives, despite increasing urbanisation, and in the biogeochemical cycles that allow the planet to function effectively, Bardgett considers how superior soil management could combat global issues such as climate change, food shortages, and the extinction of species. Looking to the future, Bardgett argues that it is vital for the future of humanity for governments worldwide to halt soil degradation, and to put in place policies for the future sustainable management of soils. For more information, see Richard’s recent blog.

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