Irene Cordero – personal profile

I am postdoc researcher in the lab, with Richard Bardgett as supervisor. Here I work in a project entitled “Resistance and resilience of soil microbial communities under intense land use and extreme drought: consequences for ecosystem functioning”. The main objective of this project is to evaluate how changes in the diversity and composition of soil microbial communities (bacteria and fungi) impacts their ability to withstand and recover from repeated perturbations, and understand the consequences of this for ecosystem functioning (nutrient cycling, greenhouse gasses emission, carbon storage, etc.). This project is funded by the “Ramón Areces Foundation”.

Previously I carried out my PhD in the Spanish Research Council (CSIC) and The University Complutense of Madrid in the different determinants for forest regeneration and the potential use of beneficial soil microorganisms for ecological restoration in the Atiquipa Forest of Peru. I evaluated the effect on the main tree species of forest management, abiotic conditions (drought and light stress) and biotic relationships (soil microorganisms).

irene

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Irene Cordero – personal profile

Cristina Heredia Acuña – personal profile

I get my Bachelor Degree in Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico on Biology (2004-2008) and my Master Degree in Colegio de Postgraduados in Edaphology (2009-2011)

My PhD research at the UoM will try to elucidate the mechanisms through which roots affect soil C cycling, in monocultures and in species mixtures. I will focus on root turnover and decomposition. Additionally, I will be testing how these processes could be affected by events like drought and warming. Using field and glasshouse experiments, and a combination of non-destructive methodologies, joint with litter bags and chemical analysis to determine changes on carbon dynamics.

Cristina Heredia Acuña – personal profile

Melanie Jane Edgar – personal profile

My interest is in utilising research techniques to develop applicable land management strategies for farmers at the individual farm-scale to improve animal welfare and offset environmental impacts whilst maintaining economic viability within the agricultural industry. I am currently reading for a PhD Environmental Biology at the University of Manchester, funded as a BBSRC CASE student working with Natural England and the National Trust. My project aims to explore how grazing influences soil carbon and nitrogen storage, and greenhouse gas emissions in upland grasslands. The ultimate goal is to provide a mechanistic understanding of the effects of grazing that can be used to formulate land management strategies for climate mitigation in the uplands.

You can follow my work using @agroecofarm on twitter and instagram.

 

Melanie Edgar
Melanie Jane Edgar – personal profile